Weekly Updates

Please check here each week BEFORE coming to class, as I will post updates here on a regular basis. Thank you!

REMINDER: Please take the time to fill out an evaluation. Thank you! Catherine

Course Evaluations  for all York and Sheridan courses will be available for your feedback November 15 to December 8 at  http://courseevaluations.yorku.ca/

Instructors will provide time during class where possible.  Your feedback is important.  Contact me if you have any questions.

Best,
Antonia

Antonia Schneider • Undergraduate Program Assistant
Department of Design

 

GENTLE REMINDER: DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21

Rough cuts are due. Use the videos you shot last week and put them in a visual narrative order the best you are able:

“The Rough Cut

https://www.videomaker.com/article/c3/17887-stages-of-editing

The structured organization of the first assembly sets you up to make the rough cut. The rough cut is the first true edit and is the stage in which you start to display your craft as more than a technical exercise. At this stage, it is no longer about solely discovering and organizing footage, it’s about storytelling and crafting a message, using the footage from production as a foundation to achieve the director’s vision.

Timing is vital to the rough cut. A video editor influences the timing of a video more than any other person who touches the production. It is during the rough cut that you start to play with the timing. Whether making fast cuts or extending pauses, here you begin to create what will become an emotional connection with the audience.

The stages of video editing are sequenced for efficiency. Each stage builds upon the work that was accomplished in previous stages.

The rough cut is meant to be shared. The video editor works with the director, producer and a client, if it’s their project. Communication is kept open between all parties and much dialog takes place, helping to shape the overall edit. The parties agree on what changes need to take place before the edit moves on to the final cut.”

https://helpx.adobe.com/prelude/using/prelude-create-roughcut.html

A rough cut is a timeline-based sequence of video and audio clips that is used as a basic editing process of the various clips before the final sequence is completed. Editing processes include trimming, clips selection, and sorting and ordering the clips.

Create a rough cut

  1. Select File > Create Rough Cut.
  2. Enter a name for the rough cut (.arcutx) file, and click Save.
  3. Double-click the rough cut in the Project panel to open it in the Timeline and Monitor panels.
  4. Select the movie clips or subclips to add to the rough cut.
  5. Select File > Append To Rough Cut. The movie clips are added to the Timeline in the order in of their selection. Alternatively, drag the movie clips to the Timeline.
  6. Use the options in the Rough Cut menu to select or reorder movie clips in the rough cut.
  7. Save the project to save changes to the rough cut file.

Note:

To create a copy of your rough cut, select File > Save Rough Cut As, and save the rough cut file using  a different name.

Note:

Prelude CC October 2014.1 and later versions save rough cut files with .arcutx extension. Previous versions of Prelude CC saved rough cut files with .arcut extension.

Video editing workflow[edit]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rough_cut

“With the advent of digital video editing software and non-linear editing systems (NLE), films or television shows go through a number of stages. There is often a large amount of footage to be reviewed in a given project. A number of the preliminary stages can be undertaken by lower cost staff, or people less skilled in using expensive and sophisticated editing equipment such as directors. An example workflow is given below:

  1. Digitizing: Ingesting the material into a digital computer allows the footage to be handled much more simply than when it is on its original tape or film form.
  2. Logging: Logging the shot material allows particular shots to be found more easily later
  3. Offline editing: Video effects.
    1. Initial Assembly: The selected shots are moved from the order they are filmed in into the approximate order they will appear in the final cut.
    2. Rough cut: More shot selection, approximate trimming. The sound is untreated, unfinished, and will require sound editing. Often dialogue and sound effects will be incomplete. Titles, graphics, special effects, and composites are usually represented only by crude placemarkers. Colors are untreated, unmatched, and generally unpleasant.
    3. Final cut: The final sequence of images and sound are selected and put in order.
  4. Online editing: The picture and sound quality of the project is adjusted and brought to their optimum levels.
  5. Mix: Audio is finished by a specialist with equipment in acoustically-treated rooms.”

 

Weds, Nov 16: Please take the time to fill out an evaluation. Thank you! Catherine

Course Evaluations  for all York and Sheridan courses will be available for your feedback November 15 to December 8 at  http://courseevaluations.yorku.ca/

Instructors will provide time during class where possible.  Your feedback is important.  Contact me if you have any questions.

Best,
Antonia

Antonia Schneider • Undergraduate Program Assistant
Department of Design
School of the Arts, Media, Performance & Design

Weds, Nov 2

A hasty, hopefully helpful post:STORYBOARD EXAMPLES of PHASE TWO (after thumbnails… ) from Lupton book, Graphic Design: the new basics. 

Screen Shot 2016-11-02 at 7.48.37 PM.pngScreen Shot 2016-11-02 at 7.48.24 PM.png 

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Ripple & Rolling Edits in PM

Here’s the link that shows you the two different kinds of edits you will commonly use, which I talked about in class yesterday. By using these edits (& resetting your ‘Preferences’ default in PM to using these types) will save you an enormous amount of time.

Ripple and Rolling Edits in PM
http://tv.adobe.com/watch/learn-premiere-pro-cs6/editing-with-the-ripple-and-rolling-edit-tools/

Have a great Thanksgiving!

Mon 9/9/13

C Ishino on September 9, 2013 at 9:28 pm said: Edit
IMPORTANT: DSLR cameras (only video cameras work) do NOT import DIRECTLY into iMovie. Use iPhoto to import videos. Then export as MPEG-4s into iMovie.

REMINDER: post your name and email here so I may invite you onto the Class website. Set up your Vimeo and Wordprss sites. THEN link them back to Class website.

Thanks and look forward to seeing your Exercise 1.

Best,
Catherine

* Please include photo of yourself as ‘gravatar’, so I may begin to associate faces and names together!

The course focuses on the visual grammar and language syntax of time-based communication and motion graphics and explores concepts and techniques involved in the integration of images, typography, digital video and audio into vibrant and persuasive communication environments